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The Art of John Scott

More about John Scott

Artist John Scott was born in New Orleans and raised in the city’s Lower Ninth Ward. He taught at Xavier University for more than 40 years and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 1992 by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, a highly prestigious honor that came at the height of his career.

Scott was known for creating vibrant kinetic sculptures that explored themes such as the diddly-bow string instrument from West African culture, or the rhythms and movements inspired by early 19th-century slave dances in New Orleans’s famed Congo Square. His large woodcuts drew heavily upon life in the city, especially its rich African-Caribbean culture and musical heritage.

More about Scott’s life and career

Louis No. 2
2003, Woodcut; 79”x 48”; Roger Ogden
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Window Fan
2003, Woodcut; 79”x 48”; Roger Ogden
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Night Lyr for Brother Rey
2003, Woodcut; 79”x 48”; Roger Ogden
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Circle of Dance: For Tommy Mabel
2003, Woodcut; 79”x 48”; Roger Ogden
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Urban Placemat: Crossroads
1998; Painted Aluminum 16”x 14”x 2”; The Diana Helis Henry Fund of The Helis Foundation
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Off The Edge: Neighborhood Block
1993; Painted Aluminum; 31”x 32”x 32.25”; Josef Sternberg Memorial Fund
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Circle of Dance: Big Sister’s Window
2001; Bronze Patina; 22”x 53”x 15”; George Rodrigue
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Urban Warrior: Swaddling Close
2005; Mixed Media on Board; 35”x 48”; The Diana Helis Henry Fund of The Helis Foundation
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I Remember Birmingham
1996; Painted Aluminum; 39″x20″x10″; Dr. Michael Sartisky
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Two Lines for Rickey
1985; 13”x 40”x 6”; Sydney & Walda Besthoff
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Black Butterfly
1996; Aluminum & Steel; 60”x 79”x 36”; The Diana Helis Henry Fund of The Helis Foundation
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Urban Crucifix
Aluminum & Steel ; 36”x 24”; Lyndon & Janine Barrois
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